One area of automation that isn’t quite “there yet” in the world of e-commerce automation is shipping cost estimation. We’re going to explore the complex world of shipping estimates and look specifically at how Shopp is designed to handle some of the more nuanced shipping issues.

Shipping – More Art than Science

Squares by Paul Hart, Glasgow, Scotland, GB

Shipping – More Art than Science

Shipping estimates is one of those areas, where there are logistic companies making big bucks, because they are taking enterprise-level projects to custom-model shipping cost estimates for big companies. The reason this area of e-commerce still stands out is that each company that sells physical products usually does so in very different ways, but in ways that are very intuitive for humans, and very complicated for computers. When a human is faced with a pile of items to be packaged up and shipped out, the human can sort through the pile, effortlessly processing in their mind, what is truly a the silicone-melting set of complexities before them.

The Problem with Automation

Have you ever stopped to marvel at how fundamentally “the game” has changed in the world of business, because of technological automation? What used to be a very manual process of taking orders face-to-face with your clients, can now evolve into a very hands-off, automated process of your customers interfacing with your web server over an internet connection. You don’t have to do anything at the point of sale, with e-commerce. After the initial investment of getting your site going, you can be sitting, reading your newspaper on Sunday morning, and somewhere in the ether, a commercial transaction is taking place, unbeknownst to you. You’re making that sale for as close to zero-marginal cost as physically possible. It’s a dream come true.

This dream doesn’t come without some sacrifices. One of the major sacrifices we e-commerce businessmen have to face is that some real-world tasks aren’t yet easily translated into automated processes, due to the still superior human-brain. While a computer can be tasked to do just about any computation task with good programming, [“some tasks that would be simple for a kindergartener to accomplish, are amazingly complicated for a computer.”]

One area of automation that isn’t quite “there yet” in the world of e-commerce automation is shipping cost estimation. This is one of those areas, where there are logistic companies making big bucks, because they are taking enterprise-level projects to custom-model shipping cost estimates for big companies. The reason this area of e-commerce still stands out is that each company that sells physical products usually does so in very different ways, but in ways that are very intuitive for humans, and very complicated for computers. When a human is faced with a pile of items to be packaged up and shipped out, the human can sort through the pile, effortlessly processing in their mind, what is truly a the silicone-melting set of complexities before them.

With e-commerce, this has to happen in an instant, and the computer must tally a shipping estimate that can be used when the payment actually takes place, and that estimate has to be accurate enough to accomplish two goals:
1. The merchant wants to, at a minimum, cover his shipping and handling costs, and
2. Do so without setting a price that will cause his customer to abandon the transaction.

If the shipping cost estimate is too high, this is great from a profit-margin perspective for the merchant, however it is likely a number of customers will balk at the price tag (I mean, really, do you think I’m gonna pay $30 bucks for you to ground-ship a pair of shoes to my house. You can forget it.) Now, if the shipping estimate is too low, this will be good for sales-conversion, but it’s gonna eat into your profit margin. Sure, I can buffer my shipping costs into my sale price, or add a flat handling fee to the estimate, but that has the potential of adversely effecting my sales conversion just as much as too-high shipping estimate to begin with.

Really, what I want is a solution that can get me as close to the mark as possible, not too high, not too low. I just want to cover my costs of shipping, period.

First, I’m gonna better explain the problem, and then I’m going to give you an idea of how the Shopp plugin has addressed this problem in the past, and how the tool has evolved to address these problems in the future.

What the heck’s the big deal, anyway?

Hold on a second, you say. Come on, this can’t really be that hard. After all, shipping providers such as the US Postal Service, UPS, and FedEx have automated programming APIs for giving accurate shipping cost estimates, instantaneously. Why can’t you just use one of those?

The answer is that we do, and still there exists a set of problems those services really have no ability to solve on their own. These problems are real, and they have a hugh bearing on the success or failures of your sales. Just because you sent a list of items through the FedEx (or UPS or USPS) shipping estimate API doesn’t at all mean that the cost you get back will accurately reflect what will your bill will be when you actually ship the products. Here’s why:

Packaging. All of the above automated systems assume that when you are asking for a shipping cost estimate, you already know the precise set of packages that will be actually shipped. In the world of e-commerce there is only one scenario where this is an easy problem. That scenario is one where every item in your catalog is ready to ship out the door, as is, without additional packaging work. If this fits the description of your store, right now, then great! Shipping isn’t a problem for you, and you can stop reading this article right now.

However, this isn’t true for many merchants. For many companies that ship varied products, they have a mixture of products that are appropriate to ship together in one package, and products that must ship alone, and a lot of situations that have to be decided in the warehouse.

[“The problem with e-commerce automated shipping estimates is that you have no way of knowing before-hand what precise combination of items the customer will choose, and what they choose will have a large bearing on how the order will finally be packaged, and more importantly, what it will actually cost to ship.”]

An Electric Supply Warehouse

Take for example the case of an electrical supply warehouse. Let’s say my warehouse for years has sold light bulbs of every shape and size, little electronic gizmos and do-dads, along with big, heavy, and long metal conduit, some heavy transformers and ballasts, all number of fuse-boxes, wall-boxes, you name it. Traditionally, we’ve only ever sold at the checkout counter, but now some wise-guy (me) wants to go and put our entire catalog on-line, so that we can sell nation-wide. jazz-hands

Great! There are many very affordable options for creating an online sales catalog on a web-site , and plenty of solutions for handling a shopping-cart, tallying up the order, gathering shipping address information, and processing the payment automatically. (Just face it, you know you want to use Shopp on the project)

So, I hire a developer, and he throws the site together in a couple months, and we go live. We do a big advertising blitz, and immediately our web-guy tells us we are getting a lot of hits on our site. He can even tell from analytics data that people are putting our products in the cart… Sales are coming in, but it’s usually for one or two big-things, like a transformer. Ok, good start, but he also tells us that we are seeing a lot of abandoned orders. We put an online survey up on our brand-new nifty WordPress company blog, and low and behold, we start getting comments of way over-inflated shipping-estimates.

So, we call the developer. The developer says, “Well, here’s the thing. The reason the shipping estimates are so high is because we are quoting each and every item on the order as a separate package, even if you would normally put some of these things together.” This isn’t something the developer foresaw happening. He covered his “technical” bases, and got my site wired-up, along with shiny automated shipping calculations through FedEx, but for a number of reasons, it isn’t performing as my company would do things “in the real-world”. The developer tells me the only other option, is to have all the items in each order tallied up by weight, and get a “weight-only” estimate.

“Ok, we’ll go with that”, I say. Something in the back of my mind is sounding the silent alarm. How accurate is that likely to be? It can’t be that simple.

So, my web-developer flips the switch, and next thing I know sales are booming. Wow, what a success.

The next week, my accounting gal calls me up, and says “We’ve got a problem. You know all those orders we took last week on the web-site? Ya, well if we fulfill them we’re gonna take a 15% average blood-bath on shipping costs. It’s gonna suck up our margin.” Oh no! The estimates are way too low on average.

So, I sleep on the problem, and come in fresh the next day and start writing down all the things my web-site must do:

  • all the conduit needs to ship separately, freight
  • all the light-bulbs and small items need to be shipped together, however we need to make sure only light items go with fragile things, and we need plenty of packing foam to keep the fragile stuff safe
  • all the small heavy stuff needs to ship together, but ballasts add up in weight fast, and they can’t amount to more than 50 lbs or our warehouse guys can’t lift it.
  • we want to take advantage of some flat-rate boxes, but some things don’t fit, so we only want to get flat-rate shipping estimates on items that fit in the flat-rate boxes.
  • we need the shipping quote to reflect the different shipping methods we’ll be using for each item, so take down the individual shipping methods that FedEx is offering, and make them more generic, but still accurate to time-bound services such as next-day, 2nd day, etc.

I call up the developer, and tell him my new requirements while he quietly listens. I can tell from the slight quiver in his voice, something is wrong. The developer tells me this list of features is getting way “out of scope” for the original project. He says, “you’re gonna have to settle for some sort of middle ground. There is no way that I’m developing all that on the originally settled price for this web-site. Perhaps we can leave things as is, but add a flat handling fee to help bolster up that loss you are taking, without pushing the cost so high that the customer abandons the sale.”

I’m now doubtful, but just out of curiosity, I ask the developer what it would cost to have the web-site give picture perfect, accurate shipping estimates every time, and he plays the “get out your wallet” card. He knows based on my real-world business model, and the limitations of the e-commerce software, that this is going to be very very difficult to do and will likely require custom software development that might leave him with a big open-ended risk on this project.

He also knows that it would be expensive to shop around for a completely new e-commerce solution that specializes in complex shipping modeling, if one even exists, and migrating the site to a new solution that has these tools is gonna be expensive too. The developer doesn’t even know if such a system is truly possible, at least in a budget that any sane company of my size can actually afford.

Long story short, I’m pissed off at my developer (shouldn’t he have seen this coming), I withhold the final payment installment on the web-site, and litigation ensues. [“Armageddon over shipping estimates.”]

Ok, this is fictional, but it could really happen if you don’t understand the limitations of the technology you are using. I’ve worked with people who have run into this very same sort of scenario. The truth is the client often doesn’t understand each edge-case from the real-world perhaps means a mountain of programming code and complexity. Sometimes, you have to do the best you can with what you have. If your tool doesn’t do what you want, you often have to settle for a work-around or compromise, find another tool, and/or start shelling out the cash to get what you want.

Ok, so now you’re gonna tell me how Shopp is so much better.

Well, actually, no I’m not. The current version of Shopp (Shopp 1.1.9) has a set of built-in tools (read below), none of which are perfect, or accomplish much of the, frankly insane, list of requirements above. The new version that’s coming out soon, Shopp 1.2, does much, much better, but still won’t hit the bullseye.

What I am going to tell you, is how the current version of Shopp, and the next, will help you tailor your shipping cost estimates to get a close as you can, with relative comfort. Will the figures listed on your customer’s receipt always match the figure you pay your shipping provider? No, they won’t in all cases. Can you prevent losing your shirt and keep sales flowing? Absolutely.

Here’s how:

Option 1: Use some built-in tools for still imperfect, but progressively better estimates.

Out of the box, Shopp has a number of built-in options that don’t use fancy shmancy programming API’s to get shipping estimates (although, we have some current and upcoming ways to handle the fancy stuff too, keep reading.)

Flat Order Rates

[“Flat Order Rates shipping is the simplest built-in shipping rate option in Shopp.”] This is for merchants that need very simplistic shipping charges, setting a single flat-rate for shipping based on the general location the order will ship too. Flat rates are appropriate for merchants who know their typical shipping costs per order very well, and wish to limit the shipping charges that are displayed for their customers.

Beware, your customers will be charged the same rate whether they are purchasing $1000 of merchandise weight over 100 lbs. or only $1 of merchandise weighing a few ounces. In other words, if you have high variability in the orders you typically ship, your risks for using flat-rate on order shipping are both in losing money on transactions for shipping, and losing sales on orders where your flat-rate figures are too high.

Setup Flat Order Rates in Shopp 1.1

In Shopp 1.1, Flat Rate per order is setup from your WordPress Admin under Shopp → Settings → Shipping screen. Tip: you can add more than one built-in rate calculator. Each label will appear on the checkout form, with an option for the customer to select it.

To configure Flat Order rates:
1. Type the name/label you wish to appear on the checkout form for this shipping method. Example “Standard, Next Day, Expedited, Ground”
2. Select the time frame that will be displayed as the delivery estimate. For instance, of next day shipping or expedited shipping, you might choose 1 business day or (1-2 days, etc.)
3. Select Flat Rate on order
4. Fill out a rate for the order on this method for each country or region listed. It is important to note that any rates you have left with $0 will be free for countries in that region. If you aren’t prepared to ship to some countries, be sure to remove those countries from your Target Markets countries list.

For all base countries, you must specify three rates:

  • the base country rate
  • the home world-region rate
  • the World-wide rate

Depending on your base country, the world region will be one of:

  • North America
  • Central America
  • South America
  • Europe
  • Middle East
  • Africa
  • Asia
  • Oceania

If your base of operations is in the US or Canada, you can optionally set rates for domestic regions within your base country. You can enable these domestic regions by checking the Enabled checkbox by the Domestic Regions setting in your Shipping Settings.

In the US, these domestic regions are:

  • Northeast US – MA, RI, NH, ME, VT, CT, NJ, NY, PA
  • Midwest US – OH, IN, MI, IA, WI, MN, SD, ND, IL, MO, KS, NE
  • South US – DE, DC, MD, VA, WV, NC, SC, GA, FL, AL, TN, MS, KY, LA, AR, OK, TX
  • West US – MT, CO, WY, ID, UT, AZ, NM, NV, CA, HI, OR, WA, AK

In Canada, domestic regions are:

  • Northern Canada – YT, NT, NU
  • Western Canada – BC, AB, SK, MB
  • Eastern Canada – ON, PQ, NB, PE, NS, NF

Flat Rate shipping on order settings

Setup Flat Order Rates in Shopp 1.2

Flat-Rate shipping estimates on orders in Shopp 1.2 is very similar to Shopp 1.1 in function, however the shipping rates settings allow for much more granular control over setting a specific rate for a specific region, country, state/provice, or even a specific postal code.

Adding Flat Order Rates
1. In the WordPress Admin, expand the Setup menus under the Shopp and select Shipping.
2. Click the pull-down menu Add a shipping method and select Flat Order Rates.

Setup Flat Order Rates
1. Label your Flat Order Rate in the Option Name text field
2. Add one or more Destinations by clicking the Destination pulldown, and selecting a region. Note: Each time you select a destination, if there is a smaller area in Shopp’s lookup tables, it will be dynamically loaded after you select that region. Click the same destination pulldown again to see the smaller areas.
3. If applicable, set a specific postal code for the rate.
4. Set the rate for this destination
5. Add additional Destinations by clicking the Add Destination Rate button.
6. When you have completed the Flat Order Rate, click the Save Changes button.

Flat Order Rate settings

Flat Item Rates

The Flat Item Rates built-in shipping rate calculator in Shopp is very similar to Flat Order Rates, except that instead of one flat rate for the entire order, a flat rate is applied for each item in the cart. Note: the Flat Item Rate is multiplied by each quantity of the item in the cart. [“The Flat Item Rate option is used when all items in the catalog have the same average cost to ship.”] You should probably not use this option if there is a great variance from item to item in your product catalog in the cost to ship the item to different destinations.

An example of a good candidate for Flat Item Rates would be a T-Shirt store. In this case, it is usually easy for the merchant to understand, relatively, what it will cost to ship a T-shirts, and there isn’t likely to be a big difference for multiple quantity.

Note: If you run a store where you ship items in bulk, and want additional control over the shipping rates based on the quantity, order price, or order weight, you might instead try one of the built-in Tiered shipping rate calculators, such as Item Quantity Tiers, Order Amount Tiers, Order Weight Tiers, or new in Shopp 1.2, Percentage Rate Tiers.

Setup Flat Item Rates in Shopp 1.1

In Shopp 1.1, Flat Item shipping rates are setup from your WordPress Admin under Shopp → Settings → Shipping screen. Each label will appear on the checkout form, with an option for the customer to select it.

To configure Flat Item Rates:
1. Type the name/label you wish to appear on the checkout form for this shipping method. Example “Standard, Next Day, Expedited, Ground”
2. Select the time frame that will be displayed as the delivery estimate. For instance, of next day shipping or expedited shipping, you might choose 1 business day or (1-2 days, etc.)
3. Select Flat Rate per item
4. Fill out a rate for each item on this method for each country or region listed. It is important to note that any rates you have left with $0 will be free for countries in that region. If you aren’t prepared to ship to some countries, be sure to remove those countries from your Target Markets countries list.

For all base countries, you must specify three rates (optionally more for US and Canada domestic rates):

  • the base country rate
  • the home world-region rate
  • the World-wide rate

Depending on your base country, the world region will be one of:

  • North America
  • Central America
  • South America
  • Europe
  • Middle East
  • Africa
  • Asia
  • Oceania

Flat Item Rate setup in Shopp 1.1

Setup Flat Item Rates in Shopp 1.2

Flat-Rate shipping estimates on orders in Shopp 1.2 is very similar to Shopp 1.1 in function, however the shipping rates settings allow for much more granular control over setting a specific rate for a specific region, country, state/provice, or even a specific postal code.

Adding Flat Item Rates
1. In the WordPress Admin, expand the Setup menus under the Shopp and select Shipping.
2. Click the pull-down menu Add a shipping method and select Flat Item Rates.

Setup Flat Item Rates
1. Label your Flat Item Rate in the Option Name text field
2. Add one or more Destinations by clicking the Destination pulldown, and selecting a region. Note: Each time you select a destination, if there is a smaller area in Shopp’s lookup tables, it will be dynamically loaded after you select that region. Click the same destination pulldown again to see the smaller areas.
3. If applicable, set a specific postal code for the rate.
4. Set the rate for this destination
5. Add additional Destinations by clicking the Add Destination Rate button.
6. When you have completed the Flat Item Rate, click the Save Changes button.

Flat Item Rates settings in Shopp 1.2

Item Quantity Tiers

The Item Quantity Tier built-in shipping calculator is much like the Flat Item Rate option, except it will let you specify a different price for many different tiers of quantity. [“The Item Quantity Tier option is appropriate when shipping cost for all items in the catalog will vary depending on quantity.”] The typical use of the option is to gradually reduce the shipping rate per item as the item quantity increases. In other words, you can give a price break on shipping costs to a customer who is buying 10 of your items, over someone who is only buying 1 or 2.

Setup Item Quantity Tiers in Shopp 1.1

In Shopp 1.1, an Item Quantity Tiered shipping option is setup from your WordPress Admin under Shopp → Settings → Shipping screen.

To setup an Item Quantity Tier option
1. Type the name/label you wish to appear on the checkout form for this shipping method. Example “Standard, Next Day, Expedited, Ground”
2. Select the time frame that will be displayed as the delivery estimate. For instance, of next day shipping or expedited shipping, you might choose 1 business day or (1-2 days, etc.)
3. Select Item Quantity Tiers in the pull-down below the time estimate selector.
4. Enter the highest quantity threshold for each tier in the first column of each row. Bear in mind that the top tier is the smallest quantity tier, and the bottom tier is the highest quantity tier. Do not attempt to enter from largest to smallest.
5. For each tier, fill out a rate for each item on this method for each country or region listed. It is important to note that any rates you have left with $0 will be free for countries in that region. If you aren’t prepared to ship to some countries, be sure to remove those countries from your Target Markets countries list.
6. When you are ready to add the next tier, click the Add row button icon on the far right of that row. (click the Delete row icon icon at the far right of each row to remove it).
7. If you want the top tier to catch every qty larger than a certain number, enter a +/plus sign in the quantity threshold field for the bottom row.

Setup Item Quantity Tiers in Shopp 1.1
Item Quantity Tiers setting in Shopp 1.1

Order Amount Tiers

The Order Amount Tiers built-in shipping calculator allows you to create tiers of shipping rates based on a range of order subtotal amounts. [“Order Amount Tiers are appropriate for stores that have varying shipping costs that relate most closely with the value of the products shipped.”] In other words, if it costs more you to ship your more expensive products than it does for you to ship your less expensive products, then Order Amount Tiers may work great for you.

This is also a good way to pad-in extra cost for insurance on expensive big-ticket items.

On the other hand, some merchants may have very cheap items that are quite expensive to ship (tubs of plaster), and expensive items that are very cheap to ship (micro-chips). Order Amount Tiers may be inappropriate for such stores.

Setup Order Amount Tiers in Shopp 1.1
Setup Order Amount Tiers in Shopp 1.2

Order Weight Tiers

The Order Weight Tiers built-in shipping calculator allows you to create tiers of shipping rates based on a range of total order weights. [“Order Weight Tiers are appropriate for stores that have varying shipping costs that relate most closely with the total order weight.”]

Setup Order Weight Tiers in Shopp 1.1
Setup Order Weight Tiers in Shopp 1.2

Percentage Rate Tiers

The Percentage Rate Tiers built-in shipping calculator is new in Shopp 1.2, and allows for a precise ratio of shipping cost to the subtotal on the order. [“Percentage Rate Tiers are similar to Order Amount Tiers, however Percentage Rate Tiers offer a more precise relationship between shipping costs and product value.”]

If you know that your store runs from 10% to 15% per order in shipping costs, then you can setup tiers ranging from 15% for smaller orders, and graduate the rates down to 10% for larger orders, thus distributing the risk between you and your customers. Perhaps you would take the opposite approach, and have the higher 15% rates for larger orders, to ensure that your shipping costs are well covered, and your margin is well protected. You could also use this calculator to have a single tier (and thus a single ratio), for all order amounts.

Just remember that if you set the ratio too high, you may run the risk of shopping cart abandonment, and if you set it too low, you could be sacrificing part of your profit margin.

Setup Percentage Rate Tiers in Shopp 1.2

Option 2: Online Shipping Add-Ons

Shopp offers a number of on-line real-time quotes from many popular shipping carriers, such as from the USPS, UPS, FedEx, Canada Post, and Australia Post for Shopp transactions. Because of the problems of getting estimates that work for all merchants, and all store types, Shopp’s online shipping calculators are evolving.

First, I’ll describe what we have been doing, and then I’ll describe some of Shopp 1.2’s enhancements.

Shopp 1.1 Packaging for On-line Shipping calculators

Over the course of supporting shipping services for Shopp in the early days of the project, we started to get some varied complaints about its behavior. For merchants who were setting up Shopp stores for the first time, we were either hearing from them that Shopp was producing shipping estimates form on-line shipping rate providers that were either too high by a lot, and causing cart abandonment, or that Shopp was producing estimates that were too low by a lot, and this was causing merchants to lose money.

When doing some analysis with these customers, what we found was that it was not always appropriate to treat each item as a separate package (some merchants have obvious cases where items should be packaged together, such as many small and light-weight items), and it was likewise inappropriate to always treat each item as if it could always be packaged with another item (some merchants have items that must always be packaged separately).

[“Shopp 1.1 uses a middle-ground approach”] (middle-ground here doesn’t at all mean that it was appropriate for all those extreme cases). The default packaging approach that was used in all shipping modules in Shopp 1.1 was one of packaging multiple quantities of any item together in one package, and different items were packaged in separate packages.

To illustrate what I mean, lets say we have a store that sells two toys, Rubik’s cubes, and the Sorry board-game. If a customer put 4 Rubik’s cubes and 2 Sorry board-games in their cart, Shopp would attempt to get shipping rates based on two packages:

  • Package 1: QTY(4) Rubik’s Cubes
  • Package 2: QTY(2) Sorry games

As it has been pointed out, this solution has been inadequate for some merchants, because if I only sell different types of bean-bags, I want to be able to put all the bean bags my packaging can hold into one package. If I am selling big-screen TV’s, it doesn’t matter if the customer buys two, they must be packaged separately. Clearly, a more general purpose solution was needed.

Packaging in Shopp 1.2

[“Shopp 1.2 has some new Packaging Settings that will help more merchants achieve shipping rates that are appropriate for their store’s unique wares.”] Shopp 1.2 comes with 4 default packaging behaviors:

  • All together by weight – With this packaging setting, on-line shipping rate calculators will receive one package with the total weight of all the items in the order. This will produce cheaper rates for merchants who typically are able to ship an entire order in one package.
  • All together with dimensions – With this packaging setting, on-line shipping rate calculators will receive one package that takes into account the maximum width, maximum length, and total height of all items in the order, along with the total weight. This will produce similar prices to All together by weight, however dimensions will be factored into the shipping costs.
  • Only like items together – This is the default behavior in Shopp 1.1 (read above). If this has been working well for you in the past, this option is still available. With this packaging setting, only multiple quantities of an item will be packaged in the same package, other items will be packaged separately (along with their own multiple quantities).
  • Each piece separately – With this setting, every single piece in the cart (including multiple quantities) will be shipped separately. This will produce the most expensive shipping rate quotes, but is sometimes appropriate for merchants that sell primarily “ready to ship” items.

To setup your packaging settings, in the WordPress Admin expand the Setup menus under the Shopp heading, and select Shipping. At the top of the Shipping Settings page, there are two Shipping Settings navigation links, Rates and Settings. Select Settings to see general Shipping Settings.

Then, select the Packaging setting from the Packaging drop-down menu.
Packaging Settings

After the release of Shopp 1.2, any new releases of on-line shipping calculators such as FedEx, UPS, USPS, etc, should support these packaging settings.

Also, merchants will have the ability to mark any specific product to be packaged separately in the product editor for that product. This per-product setting will override the general packaging setting for that product.

Product Editor Separate packaging

With the above general settings, and the product-specific override, it should be possible to get shipping rates that tailored more closely to how you actually package your products. While it is still possible to get order estimates that do not perfectly represent how the products will actually be shipped, with some fine tuning, you can at least get an estimate that will prevent the two extremes of loss of revenue, and loss of sales.

Package Limits

The last piece of this puzzle when it comes to packaging is limitations. If a package has no limits, it will surely not be accurate for all orders, because while it is possible to put many small, and yet heavy things (such as books) in one box, eventually, the box weight limits have been exceeded. Also, the shipper may not allow packages to exceed a certain weight, or may penalize you for weights over a certain amount.

To configure the maximum weight, under the Packaging setting above, select a package weight limit in the drop-down menu labeled Package Limit.

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